Displacement

Displacement

This project evolves from the earlier "Circulação transnacional, fronteiras e identidades", within which I developped conceptual work and expanded teh scope of reference. In teh year 2010, I will organize to lines of work

1. "OS FILHOS DE MARIA INDIA", OR "THE OFFSPRING OF MARIA INDIA".  This line of work will follow the outcomes and reactions to the article "Maria India, ou a fronteira da colonização", published in Horizontes Antropologicos, available on line at

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S0104-71832009000100003&script=sci_a...

This article focused on a character who had been born at the ship India bewteen Funchal and Moçamedes in 1884, and whose tubstone I "discovered" during a field trip to Southern Angola, Maria India; through the few elements available for her story I attempted to discuss teh experience of the migrant/settler communities involved in teh early colonization of southern Angola.  Since the publication of this article (at first considered scpeculative) I was solicited by a number of descendants, previously unknown to me and to one another) that are spread through the world (south africa, brazil, argentina, portugal) in order to wrok together in teh tasks of settling teh memory.

I plan to use this opportunity to implement new standards of collaborative ethnographic work, place, mobility.

2. conceptual work on DISPLACEMENT

In the spring 2010 I will teach a course titled "DISPLACEMENT: colonialism, migration and transnationalism in Lusophone societies", in which "Displacement" will be the starting point for the study of a range of classic and contemporary debates on colonialism, migration, slavery, plantation systems, gender inequities, racism, urbanization, transnationalism and global health issues. We will mostly refer to cases related to Portuguese colonialism and contemporary Portuguese-speaking societies - Brazil, Portugal, Cape Verde, Mozambique, Angola, the Asian enclaves and lusophone diaspora.

Estatuto: 
Entidade proponente
Financiado: 
Não
Rede: 
x
Keywords: 

Displacement; Migration; Colonialism; Embodied Experience

This project evolves from the earlier "Circulação transnacional, fronteiras e identidades", within which I developped conceptual work and expanded teh scope of reference. In teh year 2010, I will organize to lines of work

1. "OS FILHOS DE MARIA INDIA", OR "THE OFFSPRING OF MARIA INDIA".  This line of work will follow the outcomes and reactions to the article "Maria India, ou a fronteira da colonização", published in Horizontes Antropologicos, available on line at

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S0104-71832009000100003&script=sci_a...

This article focused on a character who had been born at the ship India bewteen Funchal and Moçamedes in 1884, and whose tubstone I "discovered" during a field trip to Southern Angola, Maria India; through the few elements available for her story I attempted to discuss teh experience of the migrant/settler communities involved in teh early colonization of southern Angola.  Since the publication of this article (at first considered scpeculative) I was solicited by a number of descendants, previously unknown to me and to one another) that are spread through the world (south africa, brazil, argentina, portugal) in order to wrok together in teh tasks of settling teh memory.

I plan to use this opportunity to implement new standards of collaborative ethnographic work, place, mobility.

2. conceptual work on DISPLACEMENT

In the spring 2010 I will teach a course titled "DISPLACEMENT: colonialism, migration and transnationalism in Lusophone societies", in which "Displacement" will be the starting point for the study of a range of classic and contemporary debates on colonialism, migration, slavery, plantation systems, gender inequities, racism, urbanization, transnationalism and global health issues. We will mostly refer to cases related to Portuguese colonialism and contemporary Portuguese-speaking societies - Brazil, Portugal, Cape Verde, Mozambique, Angola, the Asian enclaves and lusophone diaspora.

Objectivos: 
.
State of the art: 
see articles: <p>BASTOS, C. 2009. Maria &Iacute;ndia, ou a fronteira da coloniza&ccedil;&atilde;o: trabalho migra&ccedil;&atilde;o e pol&iacute;tica no planalto sul de Angola.Horizontes Antropol&oacute;gicos XV (31): 51-74 </p><p>ABSTRACT: This article analyses a peculiar and obscure episode in the colonial history of southern Angola. In the 1880s, the Portuguese government sponsored the settlement in the Hu&iacute;la plateau of a group of impoverished migrants from the island of Madeira. This was part of a strategy of guaranteeing territorial control, frontier expansion and definition of borders in the context of the &quot;European scramble for Africa&quot;. The study of primary sources reveals a great deal of improvisation, fragilities and ambiguities that the colonial history written in the 20th century rapidly erased and replaced for a narrative of pioneering heroism and white entitlement. </p><p>BASTOS, C. 2008. Migrants, Settlers And Colonists:&nbsp; The Biopolitics of Displaced Bodies&nbsp; International Migration 46(5): 27- 54 </p><p>ABSTRACT: All through the nineteenth century, Madeirans migrated from their Atlantic island to places as remote as Hawaii, California, Guyana and, later, South Africa. Scarcity of land, a rigid social structure, periodic famines and rampant poverty made many embark to uncertain destinies and endure the harsh labour conditions of sugarcane plantations. In the 1880s, a few hundred Madeirans engaged in a different venture:&nbsp; an experience of &quot;engineered migration&quot; sponsored by the Portuguese government to colonize the southern Angola plateau. White settlements, together with military control, scientific surveys and expeditions, contributed to strengthen the claims of European nations over specific territories in Africa. At that time, the long lasting claims of Portugal over African territories were not matched by sponsored colonial settlements or precise geographic knowledge about the claimed lands. There was little else representing Portugal than the leftover structures of the slave trade, the penal colonies and the free-lance merchants that ventured inland. In fear of losing land to the neighbouring German, Boer and British groups in southwestern Africa, the Portuguese government tried then to promote white settlements by attracting farmers from the mainland into the southern plateau of Angola. As very few responded to the call, the settlement consisted mostly of Madeiran islanders, who were eager to migrate anywhere and took the adventure of Angola as just another destiny out of the island where they could not make a living. Their bodies and actions in the new place became highly surveilled by the medical delegates in charge of assessing their adaptation. The reports document what were then the idealized biopolitics of migration and colonization, interweaving biomedical knowledge and political power over displaced bodies and colonized land. At the same time, those records document the frustrations of the administration about the difficulties of the settlement experience and the ways in which colonial delegates blamed their failure on the very subjects who enacted and suffered through it. The eugenics and racialism that pervade those writings, a currency during the age of empire, may now be out of taste both in science and in politics; however, they are not fully out of sight, and the subtle entrance of social prejudice into the hard concepts of biomedical science is still with us.&nbsp; Learning from this example may help analysing contemporary processes of medicalizing diversity or pathologizing the mobile populations, that is, the biopolitics of migration in the 21st century.&nbsp; </p><p>and conference paper </p><p>BASTOS, C. 2009 The embodied experience of displacement: travel, migration, colonization, conf. MIgrations, traditions and modernities -- comparative ethnographies, ICS, October 2009. Abstract: </p><p>In this paper I will address the experience of displacement as inscribed in the body. The category &quot;displacement&quot; covers the variety of experiences of travel, migration, and colonization, their possible combinations and the zones in-between. The embodiment of the experience produces several cultural, political, medical, anthropological and philosophical categories. I will discuss how they appear as subjective narratives, stereotypes, biomedical theories and ideological artefacts, and outline the analysis of the ways in which that representational production feeds back into the experience. Empirical data will be drawn from actual episodes of long distance displacement during colonization in the nineteenth century, intra-national migration in twentieth century Portugal, and twentieth-first century transnationalism. </p>
Parceria: 
Rede Internacional
Coordenador 
Data Inicio: 
01/01/2010
Data Fim: 
01/01/2012
Duração: 
24 meses
Concluído