(Un)Knowing Critical Histories and the Impact on Perceptions of Racism and Inequality

GI Seminars
Fri . 19 Apr . 14h30
(Un)Knowing Critical Histories and the Impact on Perceptions of Racism and Inequality

O próximo Seminário de Estudos Pós-Graduados em Psicologia Social acontece no dia 19 de abril. Phia Salter, do Davidson College, é a oradora convidada para esta sessão sobre o tema (Un)Knowing Critical Histories and the Impact on Perceptions of Racism and Inequality.

A sessão terá lugar online.

Recently in the United States (US), there have been numerous debates as to whether contemporary state policies that restrict voting access (i.e., strict voter ID laws, voter roll purges, and reductions in polling locations and hours that disproportionately impact racial minorities) constitute contemporary forms of racism or not (e.g., Brennan Center for Justice, 2021). The Marley Hypothesis—a social-psychological theory suggesting that differences in critical Black history knowledge can help explain why Black and White Americans differ in their racism perceptions (Bonam et al., 2019; Nelson et al., 2013)—suggests that this “debate” may reflect knowledge differences in understanding the extent to which voting access has been limited for various US minoritized groups in the past. In this talk, I will discuss current research applying the Marley Hypothesis to perceptions of voter suppression and the results of a brief educational intervention aimed at increasing critical historical knowledge. Informed by critical race theory and cultural psychological perspectives, I discuss the relationship between ignorance of critical histories of racism, racial identity, and denials of racism in the present.

Phia S. Salter is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Africana Studies at Davidson College where she earned her undergraduate degree in psychology. Her research utilizes cultural-psychological and critical race perspectives to inform her work on collective memory, social identity, and systemic racism. Throughout her research, one can find an integration of testing basic research theory and applications to socially relevant issues. In the classroom she is dedicated to social justice initiatives for teaching and learning. She facilitates difficult dialogues, critical thinking, and empowers students to identify, challenge and dismantle various forms of oppression and injustice. Before returning to Davidson College, she was an Associate Professor of Psychology and Africana Studies at Texas A&M University. She earned her master’s degree and PhD in social psychology from the University of Kansas.