Migration networks between Lisboa and Goiânia - identity conflicts in the emigration to Portugal

Migration networks between Lisboa and Goiânia - identity conflicts in the emigration to Portugal

The proposal aims to investigate Brazilian migrants coming from a specific state of Brazil, Goiás, and an important emigration point. Through this research, which will be done in the two ends of this transnational flow - the cities of Goiânia and Lisbon - one intends to understand the discourses and experiences that produce and/or redefine the social networks responsible for stimulate the dislocations.

By doing the opposite course, that is, starting from Lisbon, where the investigation will register and follow the "goianos", and then finishing in Goiânia, it is expected to track the dynamics of social, family, sexual, economical ties, as well as their expectations about the migratory process.

The hypothesis is that this network comprises symbolic, material and representational exchanges, which inform, re-enact, nurture and renew continuously images and relations concerning Portuguese society, as well as refer to re-configurations on the notions of "brasilidade", from a regional focus.

Estatuto: 
Proponent entity
Financed: 
No
Keywords: 

Mobility, Social Networks, Gender Relations, Transnacionalism

The proposal aims to investigate Brazilian migrants coming from a specific state of Brazil, Goiás, and an important emigration point. Through this research, which will be done in the two ends of this transnational flow - the cities of Goiânia and Lisbon - one intends to understand the discourses and experiences that produce and/or redefine the social networks responsible for stimulate the dislocations.

By doing the opposite course, that is, starting from Lisbon, where the investigation will register and follow the "goianos", and then finishing in Goiânia, it is expected to track the dynamics of social, family, sexual, economical ties, as well as their expectations about the migratory process.

The hypothesis is that this network comprises symbolic, material and representational exchanges, which inform, re-enact, nurture and renew continuously images and relations concerning Portuguese society, as well as refer to re-configurations on the notions of "brasilidade", from a regional focus.

Objectivos: 
The main objective of the proposal will be the representations about the migratory experience to Portugal regarding the economical and social expectations of the families involved in the two ends do the transnational flow; the identity negotiations with both other nationalities as well as with Brazilians from other region. It is also important to understand the imaginary about the Portuguese society built in this flow of information. <p>Gender relations within the migrant group, as well as with the other nationalities will be one of the central points of the research, as they configure one of the main forms of interaction and production of an imaginary on the migrants.</p><p>Other questions are also intended to be answered: which members of the families migrate, and which ones stay? What are the institutions involved in these networks and how they feed the possibilities of coming and going? How family and friend networks, as well as the illegal ones move? Is there a relation between internal migration in the region and the international?  What are the expectations and hopes concerning Lisbon? How they are fostered by the ones who have already migrated?</p>
State of the art: 
The recent period of Brazilian migration to Portugal, initiated in 1990's, has intensified. There have been more systematic analysis about this context, indicating a&nbsp; profile of the immigrants in this moment (Peixoto &amp; Figueiredo: 2007; Machado: 2007). These studies focus, above all, on the receiving society. One observes the socio-economical insertion in the secondary market and its intermediary position between the Portuguese and other immigrants either from Africa of East Europe (Peitxoto &amp; Figueiredo: 2007, Padilla: 2007). There is a remark on the continuous reaffirmation of Brazilian stereotypes. And there is also the weight of the illegality situations (Padilla: 2007; Peixoto &amp; Figueiredo: 2007), as well as the daily conflicts of relations between Brazilian and Portuguese individuals, announcing the conflicts of this migratory situation. <p>This context implies a double process of transformations of expectations and representations. Regarding the receiving society, these images are put in perspective in daily confrontations, triggering alternative strategies of entrance and stay in the country (Padilla: 2007; Boas: 2007; Machado: 2004, 2007). In Brazil, the recent experience of emigration has demanded a constant reallocation of subjectivities and self-representations. The identity is permanently re-configured in the relations in the receiving country, and it reveals a set of axis that create different combinations (class, region, temporality out of the country, region). (Machado: 2007; Boas: 2007; Assis: 1999).</p><p>Social networks constitute the channel through which meanings and practices are remade, forming two social fields of interpersonal and institutional relations interconnected (Assis: 1999). Symbolic and material resources nurtured between the sending society and the receiving one move through recent technologies and communication facilities (emails, virtual communities, and mobiles), travel agencies, media influence, money transfers, and even through illicit channels (Peixoto &amp; Figueiredo 2007). It is, therefore, necessary to investigate both ends of this flow, if we want to understand the conflicts around the dislocations between Brazil and Portugal.</p><p>Although it can be verified&nbsp; in Portugal the presence of Brazilians original from different cities and states of Brazil (Padilla: 2005), there are regions which provide a more substantial flow, either through informal networks of friends and relatives, or through illegal connections. The region of Goi&aacute;s is one of them. There are very few studies about it, and it is important to illuminate the way the two ends of the flow foster information and strategies which intensify the dislocation to Portugal. </p><p>Brazilian emigration has followed the contemporary migration trends. It is constituted in the majority by labour migrants, with diverse socio-economical and cultural backgrounds. Immigrants are exposed to the economical variations and political decisions of receiving countries (Castles &amp; Miller: 2003) and, at the same time, influence such issues. As part of this more recent global flow, the experience regular negotiations around the circulation of people, information and capital connected to the transnational displacements, creating new logics of survival and new ways of perceive oneself in the world. </p><p>Within Brazilian society, the emigration movement has significant consequences, such as the incorporation of migration as a financial investment of families that have relatives who emigrated (Assis &amp; Sasaki: 2001); the money transfers to Brazil increase the interest of financial and governmental institutions (Machado: 2007); the effect of migration on the estate market and in the urban development, and one observes the financial investments and the intensification of consumption. Above all, this migration is rather a result of collective action and organization and labour networks (Sales: 1999; Assis &amp; Sasaki: 2001).</p><p>The most evident impact of the Brazilian migratory phenomenon in the identity reconstructions, or of the re-positioning of the subject (Hall: 1998) in transnational dislocation. The tensions experienced in social interactions in the receiving society affect both the representations on nationality and subjective identifications (Boas: 2007). The &quot;Brasilidade&quot;, a reified and essentialized ideology re-enforcing Brazilian national unity (Maciel: 2007, da Matta: 1983) is continuously challenged by the daily confrontations with the Portuguese, other migrant communities and among Brazilians, who always face discriminations, betrayal between co-nationals, race, gender and region differentiations. </p><p>In Portugal, under the redefinitions of historical conflicts and interactions between Brazil and Portugal (Feldman- Bianco: 2002), a mirror play regarding stereotyped representations influences the relations between Brazilian migrants and Portuguese society. This can limit Brazilians in the labour market (Machado: 2007) and create difficulties in the social interactions between two nationalities (Padilla: 2007; Boas: 2007). At the same time, Brazilians suffer a fracture of expectations that the common language and cultural similarity would help in the adaptation to the Portuguese society, and such delusion lead Brazilians to re-enforce essentialized characteristics&nbsp; to position themselves in the receiving countries.</p><p>However, is the Brazilian migratory experience in Portugal limited to these issues? How do they manage to maintain the migratory networks? Considering that this emigration is relatively recent but still grows, one needs to ask what is still interesting in the receiving society. It is necessary to verify whether the representations about being Brazilian - besides imprisoning these ones and prevent their improvement in Portuguese society (Machado: 2007) - would not also be re-articulated in identity negotiations involved in this transnational, hybrid, and intercultural dislocations (Canclini: 2001), creating new relations in the immigration circle, from Portugal to other places in Europe. How do the social networks update and boost these relations? How the connections between the affirmations of nationality and of regional identity are made?</p><p>Finally, emigration is a project aiming better life conditions. In Brazil, it has meant, above all, the possibility of intensify financial investments and consumption networks. In a context more and more highlighted by the fluidity of subjectivities and for the submission to global markets (Bauman: 2007), cultural experiences of migrants are definitely informed by systems of consumption, which maintain life styles, express cultural categories (McCracken: 1988), articulate people in transnational networks and make this circulation possible. Identities, considered here as non-essentialists and fluid, travelling the contemporary world (Hall: 1998), and incomplete in real time, are printed by transformations in the migrant circuit and informed by these networks. Therefore, it is through these latter that I intend to observe diverse social identification of this process.</p>
Parceria: 
Unintegrated
Coordenador 
Start Date: 
01/03/2009
End Date: 
01/03/2012
Duração: 
36 meses
Closed